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Terry “Emeka” Thomas is the architect and advocate for proposed bill, Georgia House Bill 481 on black history and diversity to be taught in all Georgia public schools k-12. He is the recipient of a national award for Black History and Culture from the National Education Association (NEA) and the Association for the Study of African Life and History (ASALH), the Carter G. Woodson Award. A cum laude graduate of Morris Brown College, he holds a degree in Art Education and a MA in African American Studies from Clark Atlanta University,He is a doctoral candidate, Arts in Humanities, Clark Atlanta University..


In addition, he taught fine art and journalism for 20 years in Palm Beach County, Florida. As a cultural arts advocate and community organizer, he founded the African American Cultural Art Organization, Inc. (AACAO), a non-profit 501C3 entity dedicated to the enrichment of the Black and broader community. Under his leadership, the AACAO implemented Kwanzaa, Black History, Pan-African and Multicultural activities and Black Consciousness.


The AACAO presented national personalities to the community by presenting such cultural icons as Dr. Maulana Karenga, Molefi Asante, Dr. Joseph Baldwin and Dr. Na’im Akbar. Through this rigorous regimen of Black Consciousness, Mr. Thomas became a cultural icon in the state of Florida throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s and the early part of this decade. Thomas was presented a Certificate of Excellence in art and his students’ art work was selected to be published in a national publication.


Thomas' greatest organizing accomplishment to date was galvanizing the (GAE) Georgia Association of Educators , (GFT) Georgia Federation of Teachers which crystalized in the Coalition to Keep Georgia Schools Local. The coalition defeated Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal in November 2016 on Amendment 1 by a margin of 70% to 30%. Had the govenor won, he would have taken over public education in Georgia and changed the State Constitution.

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Terry “Emeka” Thomas is the architect and advocate for proposed bill, Georgia House Bill 481 on black history and diversity to be taught in all Georgia public schools k-12. He is the recipient of a national award for Black History and Culture from the National Education Association (NEA) and the Association for the Study of African Life and History (ASALH), the Carter G. Woodson Award. A cum laude graduate of Morris Brown College, he holds a degree in Art Education and a MA in African American Studies from Clark Atlanta University. He is a doctoral candidate, Arts in Humanities, Clark Atlanta University..


In addition, he taught fine art and journalism for 20 years in Palm Beach County, Florida. As a cultural arts advocate and community organizer, he founded the African American Cultural Art Organization, Inc. (AACAO), a non-profit 501C3 entity dedicated to the enrichment of the Black and broader community. Under his leadership, the AACAO implemented Kwanzaa, Black History, Pan-African and Multicultural activities and Black Consciousness.


The AACAO presented national personalities to the community by presenting such cultural icons as Dr. Maulana Karenga, Molefi Asante, Dr. Joseph Baldwin and Dr. Na’im Akbar. Through this rigorous regimen of Black Consciousness, Mr. Thomas became a cultural icon in the state of Florida throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s and the early part of this decade. Thomas was presented a Certificate of Excellence in art and his students’ art work was selected to be published in a national publication.


Thomas' greatest organizing accomplishment to date was galvanizing the (GAE) Georgia Association of Educators , (GFT) Georgia Federation of Teachers which crystalized in the Coalition to Keep Georgia Schools Local. The coalition defeated Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal in November 2016 on Amendment 1 by a margin of 70% to 30%. Had the govenor won, he would have taken over public education in Georgia and changed the State Constitution.

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